Anyone dealing with a curfew tonight?

VandVsmama

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 28, 2011
The criminals and knuckleheads destroying property, looting, stealing, setting fire to property and buildings are basically ruining it for all of the peaceful protesters all across the country who only wanted to stand up and speak out against the horrible crime committed against Mr. Floyd.
 

JimMIA

There's more to life than mice...
Joined
Feb 16, 2005
The criminals and knuckleheads destroying property, looting, stealing, setting fire to property and buildings are basically ruining it for all of the peaceful protesters all across the country who only wanted to stand up and speak out against the horrible crime committed against Mr. Floyd.
Yep. A friend of mine once told me, "If you let me frame the discussion, I will win the argument every time."

He was right, and that is exactly what the criminal element has done here -- they have re-framed the conversation...and not in a good way.
 

skyblue17

DIS Veteran
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
We have an 8pm curfew. I am not dealing with it because I have not been outside my house after 8pm in almost three months.
 
  • JimMIA

    There's more to life than mice...
    Joined
    Feb 16, 2005
    Four police officers shot in St Louis:


    And a Las Vegas officer was shot in the back of the head, and is on life support

     

    DisneyJamieCA

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 21, 2007
    But they are not going to predominately white areas to do it. They are going to the cities where the black population is greater. I think that's what the OP meant. Not suggesting that the only protesters were black. Calm down.
    Don’t tell me to calm down. That is rude and disrespectful. And the person who posted it can explain for themselves that they meant.

    And truthfully, it doesn’t matter what they meant. Either way, there was no reason to describe the racial makeup of their area. They simply could have answered with a “no”. When you use race as a descriptive word like that, there is always meaning behind it. I would invite you to educate yourself about it.
     

    nene0182

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 18, 2012
    We haven’t seen any protests in our town so no curfews here. We had a police officer killed in the line of duty two days after George Floyd was killed and there was a very peaceful vigil for both men held on Sunday night
     

    NYCgrrl

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 13, 2017
    The new curfew is 8:00 PM for us; doesn't bother me and were it not for the need for essentials to get back and forth from work I'd say 6:00 PM is fine.
     
  • AlohaNow

    Just keep swimming
    Joined
    Oct 19, 2008
    The curfew in Denver is 9pm – 5am, says the changing electronic highway signs that I see on my way in and out of town. Driving in this morning there were a few more businesses that had plywood over their windows than yesterday. I work about eight blocks away from the capitol building where all the action is centered.
     

    hopemax

    Note to Self:
    Joined
    Apr 1, 2000
    Yep. A friend of mine once told me, "If you let me frame the discussion, I will win the argument every time."

    He was right, and that is exactly what the criminal element has done here -- they have re-framed the conversation...and not in a good way.
    I disagree.

    Simple analogy. We've seen people running onto the field during sporting events. The cameras used to follow that person around, and then someone realized that wasn't helping to stop it. Now, they go back to the booth, the studio, a commercial. This is not to say we need to turn the cameras away from the rioting. But as a reminder that the person on the field, doesn't control the narrative WE DO.

    So if we are spending our time talking about how awful the rioting is, we aren't spending time talking about systemic inequality and justice. If we are watching videos of the rioting, for more than brief news updates, we aren't spending our time learning about the history of systemic inequality and justice or working toward solutions. We are letting the conversation get re-framed. And one of the hard questions we have to ask is why are we so willing to allow that.

    That's the system in action.
     

    JimMIA

    There's more to life than mice...
    Joined
    Feb 16, 2005
    I disagree.

    Simple analogy. We've seen people running onto the field during sporting events. The cameras used to follow that person around, and then someone realized that wasn't helping to stop it. Now, they go back to the booth, the studio, a commercial. This is not to say we need to turn the cameras away from the rioting. But as a reminder that the person on the field, doesn't control the narrative WE DO.

    So if we are spending our time talking about how awful the rioting is, we aren't spending time talking about systemic inequality and justice. If we are watching videos of the rioting, for more than brief news updates, we aren't spending our time learning about the history of systemic inequality and justice or working toward solutions. We are letting the conversation get re-framed. And one of the hard questions we have to ask is why are we so willing to allow that.

    That's the system in action.
    Good point, and thoughtful post. Thanks.

    Major league sports do, indeed, handle the attention-seekers very well -- but of course their broadcasters are under control of the sports league because of their big contracts.

    However, the news media are not under anyone's control (nor should they be) and their almost exclusive motivation is TV ratings and clicks online. So they focus on what brings in money. "If it bleeds, it leads!" is not a joke, and unfortunately it's not an exaggeration.

    So violence, when it is present, controls the conversation for most people and thereby controls public opinion. The conversation changed over the weekend.

    The conversation is no longer about hate, inequality, and working together. The dominant conversation is no longer "How can we make things better?"

    The dominant conversation has been changed to: "Why are authorities tolerating this violence? Their first responsibility is to public safety. Why aren't they doing their jobs?"
     

    tcufrog

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 18, 2012
    Good point, and thoughtful post. Thanks.

    Major league sports do, indeed, handle the attention-seekers very well -- but of course their broadcasters are under control of the sports league because of their big contracts.

    However, the news media are not under anyone's control (nor should they be) and their almost exclusive motivation is TV ratings and clicks online. So they focus on what brings in money. "If it bleeds, it leads!" is not a joke, and unfortunately it's not an exaggeration.

    So violence, when it is present, controls the conversation for most people and thereby controls public opinion. The conversation changed over the weekend.

    The conversation is no longer about hate, inequality, and working together. The dominant conversation is no longer "How can we make things better?"

    The dominant conversation has been changed to: "Why are authorities tolerating this violence? Their first responsibility is to public safety. Why aren't they doing their jobs?"
    While I know that media consumers are attracted to the sensational, I wish that the media would spotlight the protests that were peaceful and discuss why they were peaceful with the hope that perhaps the city leaders, police and protesters might learn how to keep things peaceful. For example, Sunday night's protest in Fort Worth ended with police firing tear gas and flash bangs at the protesters. Monday night ended peacefully through the efforts of the police and the protesters. I highly recommend reading this article because it provides some hope that there is perhaps a better way.

     
  • hopemax

    Note to Self:
    Joined
    Apr 1, 2000
    Good point, and thoughtful post. Thanks.

    Major league sports do, indeed, handle the attention-seekers very well -- but of course their broadcasters are under control of the sports league because of their big contracts.

    However, the news media are not under anyone's control (nor should they be) and their almost exclusive motivation is TV ratings and clicks online. So they focus on what brings in money. "If it bleeds, it leads!" is not a joke, and unfortunately it's not an exaggeration.

    So violence, when it is present, controls the conversation for most people and thereby controls public opinion. The conversation changed over the weekend.

    The conversation is no longer about hate, inequality, and working together. The dominant conversation is no longer "How can we make things better?"

    The dominant conversation has been changed to: "Why are authorities tolerating this violence? Their first responsibility is to public safety. Why aren't they doing their jobs?"
    The news media doesn't control the narrative if we don't let them, either. It ultimately, will come down to what you and I do. Who we vote for, who we give our business to, whose voices we choose to elevate. Do we lend our voices to that dominant conversation, or do we pull it back, like a game of tug of war. We have off buttons on our TVs and our internet takes us to history and advocacy sites just as well as it does news sites and social media. But honestly, the media I have been watching hasn't been primarily riot focused beyond the first night. The local media keeps highlighting the community leadership who are focused on justice, the daytime peaceful protests, the night time peaceful protests and the moments they have been targeted by the authorities.

    Let's not act as we, the common people, don't have a choice in what happens next, and are simply being carried by an invisible current beyond our control. Like I said in the other thread, it's been one week. Today's "dominant" conversation means as much as today's COVID-19 numbers. Let's look at the 7-day rolling average, and monthly data trends before we decide where we are. And that's an analogy I never thought I would make.

    Aye yai yai , 2020!
     

    bcla

    On our rugged Eastern foothills.....
    Joined
    Nov 28, 2012
    One more countywide order around here. They specifically address that cities can enforce their own curfews even if they extend beyond the county curfew.

     

    Bianca and Bernard

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 12, 2015
    There was one in Jacksonville on the 31st (i think), but our county (right next to Duval) said "nope, we don't need one."

    Then again, my county's sheriff's department brags about their spot on "LivePD". They also post about their drug busts on Twitter, with various hashtags including #YouWereWarned, #DrugsAreBadMmmkay, #StankySticky, #StopMethingAroundInThisCounty, and many many more.
     

    HeatherC

    Alas...these people I live with ...
    Joined
    May 23, 2003
    It is time for the Governor’s to step up and call in the National Guard if they know their cities are going to be facing more rioting and looting. Enough is enough. Just shut it down.
    Allowing this destructive and despicable behavior to continue unchecked for another night is wrong. How many more people have to die needlessly?
     

    aprilgail

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Nov 10, 2001
    I wish. The cat rescue I work at was boarded up today in anticipation of a protest near there today.
     

    Dentam

    Dreaming of Disney
    Joined
    Feb 6, 2015
    The curfew in Denver is 9pm – 5am, says the changing electronic highway signs that I see on my way in and out of town. Driving in this morning there were a few more businesses that had plywood over their windows than yesterday. I work about eight blocks away from the capitol building where all the action is centered.
    Yep, I'm in Denver as well and actually got an emergency alert reminder on my phone before it went into effect the other night. I live close to where the protests are happening (about 10 blocks away) and hear the helicopters circling overhead every evening.
     

    DisneyJamieCA

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 21, 2007
    It is time for the Governor’s to step up and call in the National Guard if they know their cities are going to be facing more rioting and looting. Enough is enough. Just shut it down.
    Allowing this destructive and despicable behavior to continue unchecked for another night is wrong. How many more people have to die needlessly?
    Bolding is mine. Isn't that the question that started this entire thing? Fix that and we might have a chance at fixing the rest.
     

    Dentam

    Dreaming of Disney
    Joined
    Feb 6, 2015
    While I know that media consumers are attracted to the sensational, I wish that the media would spotlight the protests that were peaceful and discuss why they were peaceful with the hope that perhaps the city leaders, police and protesters might learn how to keep things peaceful. For example, Sunday night's protest in Fort Worth ended with police firing tear gas and flash bangs at the protesters. Monday night ended peacefully through the efforts of the police and the protesters. I highly recommend reading this article because it provides some hope that there is perhaps a better way.

    Agreed. Our police chief joined in with peaceful protestors here yesterday I believe it was. Last night was the first evening that the protests remained peaceful after the curfew went into effect.
     





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